‘Near miss’ videos aim to shock

British Transport Police has made waves online with its new YouTube series featuring near misses around rail level crossings in the UK, as part of a new campaign to raise awareness to the dangers of rail.

‘Operation Look’ is the BTP’s program aimed at reducing the amount of accidents and near misses that occur every year at level crossings in Britain.

BTP’s YouTube channel has received thousands of views so far this week, as it has uploaded a number of videos from CCTV and other cameras, which have captured nearly catastrophic near-misses at rail crossings.

The series can be viewed here.

Also as part of Operation Look, BTP officers will be carrying out additional high-visibility patrols at a number of locations this week, but it’s BTP’s YouTube channel which is getting more attention.

During 2014, 337 motorists failed to obey warning lights or lowering barriers at level crossings in Scotland alone – where the BTP is focusing its awareness operation.

“Many of these drivers had got into the habit of deliberately misusing crossings, with figures showing people of all ages willing to risk their lives to shave a few minutes off their journey,” BTP said.

BTP’s inspector Becky Warren said: “All too often people get into the habit of taking risks at crossings and our message is simple. Use crossings safely.

“It may be tempting to jump a light to shave a minute or two off your journey, but every time you do, you endanger your life and the lives of other road and rail users. Fail to obey the signals and you may also end up with a driving ban or a criminal record. Is it really worth the risk?”

“Level crossings create a risk for people that we want to remove. Where possible we close them, and we have already closed more than 900 in the past five years,” said Darren Furness, head of level crossings for Network Rail, which is joining BTP in the awareness campaign.

“Those we cannot close we aim to make safer and awareness events like these mean we can meet and talk to motorists, cyclists and pedestrians about the dangers and how to stay safe.”

Downer lands $1bn deal with Pacific National

Australian engineering group Downer EDI has won a ten-year maintenance contract with rail operator Pacific National, that the engineer values at around $1bn.

Downer announced to the ASX today that it had struck a deal with Pacific National, a subsidiary business of transport and infrastructure business Asciano.

Downer chief executive Grant Fenn said the agreement was an important development in Downer Rail’s aim to provide “total rail asset solutions” to its customers.

“Under the agreement, Downer will provide a full suite of asset management services for over 300 Pacific National locomotives,” Fenn said.

“This includes a range of scheduled and unscheduled maintenance services and a 24 hour Fleet Control Centre.

“The new features of the agreement include remote monitoring of the assets and inspections while in service to ensure more locomotives are available for service,” he continued.

“The locomotives are out on the tracks for longer hours and that they run at higher levels of reliability.”

Pacific National moves roughly 145mt of cargo each year. The company delivers rail operations for coal and other bulk solids, as well as container transport and specialised freight, such as steel.

The Pacific National deal announced today was the second bulk handling contract win for Downer so far this year. The company announced on January 5 that it had won a deal to maintain haul truck fleets at two coal mines in Queensland’s Bowen Basin.

That contract commenced on February 1, and is worth about $60m. Around 110 people will be employed to service 90 haul trucks.

Sydney Train

Rolling stock defect detector wins award

Sydney Trains has won an award for an innovative system that is installed on the track to provide early detection of rolling stock defects.

The Project Management Achievement Award, in the Developmental Projects category at the 2014 Australian Institute of Project Management’s NSW Chapter, was awarded for Sydney Trains Third Generation Hot Box Detector Systems Project.

The awards were opened by NSW governor Marie Bashir.The Third Generation Hot Box Detector Systems Project was delivered by the Sydney Trains Maintenance Directorate’s Operational Technology team.

Part of a suite of condition monitoring systems, Hot Box Detector systems are installed on the track to provide early detection of rolling stock defects, so they can be rectified before they damage rolling stock and infrastructure, or pose a risk to public safety.

The Third Generation Hot Box Detector Systems project was particularly complex as it involved the introduction of new technology, was multidisciplinary, multi-stakeholder, had safety and operational impacts, and was industrially sensitive, Sydney Trains said.

Nonetheless, the project was delivered on time and under budget, a factor the state government agency said demonstrated its capability in project managing the procurement, trial and rollout of the latest technology to enhance network safety and service reliability.

Project manager Codruta Bastucescu accepted the award on behalf of Sydney Trains.“I was very grateful for the opportunity to manage this project. Like all disciplinary projects, it was a great team effort involving over 100 people over the course of five years. I was honoured to accept the award on behalf of Sydney Trains,” Codruta said.

Recognising 40 years of railway innovation

Australia’s premier applied research centre in railway technology last week celebrated four decades of innovative solutions in mining and commuter rail systems.

A Celebration of 40 Years of Railway Research andTechnology was held last Thursday at the Park Hyatt, Melbourne, to celebrate the 40 years of railway research and technology by Monash University’s Institute of Railway Technology (IRT).

Originally part of research activities undertaken for the companies now known as BHP Billiton Iron Ore and Rio Tinto Iron Ore, IRT is now an applied research centre at Monash University. It provides technical assistance to the world’s three biggest iron ore producers, BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto and Vale (Brazil), and more than 90 other railway entities, including leading commuter rail authorities.

IRT, which has clients in several countries, specialises in providing comprehensive solutions to technical issues in existing rail systems, whether they transport iron ore, freight or commuters. IRT is also a leader in remotely monitoring tracks and rolling stock using cutting-edge technology to detect faults before catastrophic failures occur.

Monash University’s senior deputy vice-chancellor and deputy vice-chancellor (research) Professor Edwina Cornish, congratulated IRT on leading the Australian railway technology field for four decades.

“The Institute of Railway Technology is a great example of how universities and industry can collaborate to develop solutions that drive technology forward,” Prof Cornish said.

“IRT was born out of industry need and now real-world problems continue to drive its agenda.”

Director of IRT, Ravi Ravitharan, said the institute was set to build on its success.

“IRT is continuously developing new technologies to support increasing productivity and safety requirements of the rail industry,” Ravitharan said.

“Being part of Australia’s largest university, IRT is well-placed to continue to lead the railway research and technology needs of the rejuvenated railway industry.”

The Victorian minister for public transport Terry Mulder, delivered the keynote address at the gala dinner and general manager of infrastructure at the Hong Kong rail authority MTR, Richard Keefe, and rail engineering manager at Rio Tinto Iron Ore, Leland LeBreton, both long term clients of IRT, also spoke at the event.

Heavy Haul Rail
28th – 29th August 2012 | Newcastle City Hall
www.informa.com.au/heavyhaulrail

IRT: leading technology development for mining

While the Australian economy is enjoying a fortunate position due to the thriving mining industry, research and technology have been integral factors which have enabled the mining industry to reach its current position.

As part of one of the main technology service providers for the railway industry, the personnel at the Institute of Railway Technology (IRT) at Monash University have been supporting the mining industry’s railway operations over the last four decades. IRT is continuously developing new technologies to support increasing productivity and safety requirements at the same time as reducing risks and costs, ultimately improving the bottom line of their clients.

The latest technology IRT has developed is the instrumented revenue vehicle which is a fully flexible automated measurement platform to continuously monitor and provide feedback on both rail condition and train operation. This technology is designed to be installed in standard vehicles which are embedded within a normal operation.

The IRT instrumented vehicle technology has several key advantages over previous maintenance inspection methods. With the objective of increasing production rates, mining operations are often under pressure to reduce railway track downtime. The ramifications of reducing track downtime are that it would minimize traditional track measurements and maintenance activities. This could result in a significant increase in operational risks because of a lack of maintenance and an inability to identify deterioration of track condition in a timely manner.

IRT’s instrumented vehicle technology measures the condition of a railway system during normal rail operations without requiring any track downtime. In addition, IRT’s technology measures the dynamic responses of normal vehicles during loaded and empty operating conditions under standard speed profiles. Unlike previous track recording vehicle measurements, IRT technology measurements are a direct indication of the loads being imposed on the rail network in a usual operating environment.

By Ravi Ravitharan*

It is also important to note that the information collected using the IRT’s instrumented vehicletechnology is available for railway operations within a twelve hour period. It is anticipated that in the near future real time reporting of track and train related issues would be also available.

The above technology is widely used in railway systems in mining operations and now available to all railway operations including passenger and freight, to assist with both track and rolling stock management.

The IRT instrumented vehicle technology measurements have shown an excellent correlation with track inspector findings. Now these measurements are being used extensively for track maintenance activities, and to restrict line speed to mitigate damage to and risk from deterioration of the track structure.

Assessment of the effectiveness of maintenance operations, operational planning and maintenance programming are other benefits of the new technology IRT has developed.

IRT’s instrumented vehicle technology has also been used for analysis of train driving strategies and in-train forces, train driver training, derailment investigations, analysis of the dynamic effect on bridges, dumper indexing for minimization of coupler loads and assistance with the design of new rolling stock.

IRT, the premier track and vehicle railway engineering research centre in Australia, focuses on developing new technologies that could be integrated into existing processes to provide rail operators with the ability to effectively manage their resources.

*Ravi Ravitharan is director, Institute of Railway Technology, Monash University

Heavy Haul Rail
28th – 29th August 2012 | City Hall Newcastle
For more information email: kara.clifton@informa.com.au

Wireless technology boosts Tasmanian level crossing safety

An intelligent wireless advance warning and safety system, SafeZone, that is beyond Australian safety standards has been installed at 13 level crossings across Tasmania.

The Federally funded $4m project, delivered by the Tasmanian Government in conjunction with TasRail, provides wireless roadside active advance warning signs with twin flashing lights around 200-300 metres in advance of the level crossings, and in-road centreline alert beacons between the advance warning sign and the crossing.

Australian company, Inventis Technology, which developed SafeZone over the past two years, said the key to the technology was that it addressed basic human behaviour, rather than being a variant on existing static roadside or over-road signs.

Inventis Technology national sales manager Peter Macarthur said the key to SafeZone was that it addressed basic human behaviour, rather than being a variant on existing static roadside or over-road signs.

“SafeZone places the key element of a warning system in a driver’s and their passengers’ field of vision where it is more likely to be acknowledged. It more instinctively ‘switches on’ a person’s ‘alert state’,” Macarthur said.

“By doing this repeatedly and in plenty of time to elicit a response, SafeZone is hoped to become an important part of the rail safety improvement in all states.”

Macarthur said that discussions are underway with a number of transport authorities to deploy thetechnology for use at dangerous level crossings and the overhwleming response has been that thetechnology fits well with current holistic, integrated approaches to safety improvement.

“Now is the time for Australian Transport Council members and representatives to truly assess for themselves the safety and behavioural impact SafeZone is having on road and rail users in Tasmania,” Macarthur said.

SafeZone been installed at level crossings across Tasmania including Tea Tree, Evandale, Perth, Conara, Colebrook, Avoca, Ormley, Burnie, Highclere and Hampshire.

Level crossing Victoria - Photo: Creative Commons

New technology to dramatically improve level crossing safety

A new $4m technology being developed at Victoria’s La Trobe University could significantly reduce and help to eliminate collisions, injuries and fatalities at Australia’s level crossings.

By Jennifer Perry

The technology could warn vehicles as they’re approaching a level crossing by using “mobile phone style” wireless networks that are integrated with GPS.

“The technology will have cars and trains ‘talking to each other’ and be able to warn of approaching danger from up to one kilometre away,” Victorian roads and ports minister Tim Pallas said upon launching the research project.

“Nowhere else in the world is the trial of this particular technology being proposed to the extent that we are doing in Victoria and focusing on its level crossing safety applications.”

Pallas said the research team at the university’s Centre for Technology Infusion estimated the technology could save around 37 lives at Australian road level crossings every year, as well as about $100m by eliminating rail crossing collisions.

The project is being funded by the Victorian Government, road industry research group AutoCRC and a number of rail industry partners.

The research team hopes to have the technology available within three years.

Rail turnout - RISSB

Future locos to focus on fuel and emissions

Technology roadmaps for locomotives of the future focus on two key areas according to GE Transportation’s Pete Lawson: fuel and emissions.

“The reason for that is, there is an increasing emissions regulatory environment where we sell locomotives and…where there isn’t a regulatory environment, anytime we can lower fuel is a good thing for better operations,” Lawson told Rail Express yesterday at AusRAIL PLUS.

About 75 per cent of the diesel electric market worldwide is operating under some kind of local emission regulation. America leads the way in terms of the toughest and most restrictive regulatoryenvironment for locomotives.

“The EPA doesn’t just look at meeting the levels for emissions when you ship your product new, it also requires the unit to be compliant for its useful life and…the EPA has the ability to grab a unit at any point in time…and test it to validate emissions are being maintained,” Lawson said.

Australia has no emission regulations for locomotives and nothing planned for the future. However, Lawson believes this is necessary as a responsible “citizen of the world”, especially since there is existing technology which allows locomotives to operate at significantly lower emissions levels.

The Railway Technical Society of Australasia’s executive chairman Martin Baggott told Rail Expresseven though locomotive emissions are not legislated in Australia eventually, “one way or the other this will come about”, either through direct regulation or implied through an ETS or a carbon charge.

But the Federal Government’s current ETS does not include transportation –something the industry has taken issue with – with implications for companies having to set their own emissions benchmarks.

Lawson’s final words to AusRAIL PLUS delegates were timely for industry players in Australia.

Effective emissions regulations in America has resulted in significant improvements for theenvironment, safety, operations and cost, he said.
“As a rail industry it’s critically important that we be an extremely active participant in the development of any emissions safety or regulation. At the end of the day the OEMs and operators are going to have to live with those regulations and implement them and having input and a voice in the development of those is critical,” he said.

“We must continue to invest and look forward in technology; it’s difficult to do in a downward cycle, but if you stop and take your eye off the future, the catch-up is nearly impossible.

“Cleaner and greener can be a very cost effective solution for operators and do not have to be mutually exclusive.”

Rail technology roadmaps: a Canadian perspective

The recent Rail Technology Workshop saw senior rail executives come together to kick-start the development of a technology strategy and roadmap for the Australian rail industry for the next 30-40 years.

By Jennifer Perry

While many rail organisations have developed individual technology roadmaps, the workshop marked the first time that industry came together to work towards a common technological base.

With Canada a few steps ahead of Australia, having already got a technology roadmap in place, delegates benefitted from hearing the Canadian experience that was shared by Mike Roney, chair of Canada’s Railway Research Advisory Board.

Roney said that the Canadian rail industry used the Association of American Railroads’ (AAR) technologyroadmap as a basis for developing a specific Canadian technology strategy, and took more of a freight focus because that’s where “the money is made”.

“The AAR technology roadmap started when our chief executives said that even if the railways don’t gain market share, we still have to be carrying 80 per cent more tonnage on our lines 20 years into the future which requires us to spend a great deal of money on capacity improvements,” Roney said.
“The target we came to was if we can do 50 per cent of that improvement in capacity through technology then there is a great deal of value in that for the railways.”

Canada took many of the AAR’s technology roadmap principles into consideration when developing its own strategy, including the need to develop capacity without spending capital; making assets sweat; fuel efficiency and advanced power systems; reducing in-service failures; automated health monitoring of track and rollingstock; interoperability; positive train control; and information technology that supports improved customer service.

“The next piece of evidence we put together was the visioning of the top operating officers within Canadian National and Canadian Pacific – the two major Canadian freight railways – who were basically asked what they would like their railway to be when they grow up,” Roney said.

The resulting vision highlighted key strategic areas such as the need for new technologies to lower stress states and for the rail network to be fluid, scheduled and precise; the need for safety systems to be more vital, predictive and condition based and for technologies that reduce emissions, amongst others.
Some of the technologies that featured in this vision were wireless train control systems to improve safety and capacity, friction management to control the friction levels along rail lines and reduce fuel consumption, ECP braking and longer trains with distributed power.

Key stakeholders then came together to decide on what research priorities would form Canada’s joint industry government research program for its technology roadmap; Roney said that with a lack of industry funding for research, it was paramount that funding went to areas that “everyone up the line” recognised as the top priorities.

Research projects included human behavior and compliance, energy and the environment, railroading and harsh and changing environments, infrastructure integrity, human factors, operational fluidity and capacity and emerging technologies.

Roney’s views were welcomed by the Rail Industry Safety and Standards Board’s (RISSB) general manager Kevin Taylor, who told Rail Express that with Canada “out there leading rail reform”, it had plenty of good case examples for Australia to follow including the development of a technologystrategy.
Taylor said that while the Rail Technology Strategy Workshop marked an important step in the industry’s development of a technology strategy, it was “just the start” of what may be a rather lengthy development and approval process.

“A project plan will be provided for RISSB’s approval in November, and subject to this approval, work will start in earnest,” he said.

Taylor also mentioned that it was important that broad industry buy-in was achieved in the development of the strategy and thus the RISSB process of consultation will be followed.

ARTC gets $62.3m AusLink funds for better train communications

The Australian Rail Track Corporation will build a fully interoperable and compatible communications system for trains using its interstate and Hunter Valley networks.

The Federal Government-owned corporation will also develop the blueprint for an advanced train management system (ATMS) that will include satellite-based train location technology and in-cab signalling – developments that will enable greater coal train capacity in the Hunter Valley.

Federal transport minister John Anderson said $62.3m of AusLink funds would be spent on rail communications technology on ARTC networks.

This breaks down as $42m for the development of the train communications system and $20.3m for the ATMS blueprint.

“The communications system will be based on Telstra’s code division multiple access (CDMA)technology,” Mr Anderson said.

The technology will provide a single communications medium to replace nine separate communications systems, he said.

Mr Anderson said the ATMS technology would enable more trains to operate on Hunter Valley tracks with a higher level of safety than at present.