4 kilometres of track laid on Forrestfield-Airport Link

Work is rapidly progressing on the preparation of the Forrestfield-Airport Link to run trains by late 2021.

Tracklaying works have already put in place four kilometres of track through the twin tunnels.

The future stations for the line are also coming into shape, with the high eaves over Airport Central Station recently installed.

Connecting the station atrium to the platform is the longest uninterrupted escalator in the southern hemisphere, with stretches to 35 metres long and 15 metres high.

To date, 5.7km of skeleton track has been put down, and 3.9km of track completed for the 8.5km line.

Australian contractor Martinus Rail will use over 2,400 tonnes of Australian-made steel in the project, where it has employed more than 100 local workers.

WA Premier Mark McGowan said the project, which connects the existing rail network at Bayswater with the eastern foothills via Perth’s airport, has already provided many opportunities for local businesses.

“The Forrestfield Airport Link construction employs hundreds of local workers and provides opportunities for local businesses and subcontractors,” he said.

WA Transport Minister Rita Saffioti said that with major breakthroughs so far, it will not be long until commuters are using the new line.

“We’ve reached several milestones this year with the completion of tunnelling and the start of track laying,” she said.

“The stations are almost completed and it is exciting to think trains will be running on this line in late 2021.”

Martinus CEO and managing director Treaven Martinus said that with this project under their belt, Martinus will be looking to scale up for further projects.

“Currently, we have very skilled and experienced track and overhead wiring teams in WA but our vision has always been to expand the team to encompass civil and signalling capabilities,” said Martinus.

“There are many projects coming online and we are excited about what that means for us, the opportunities it provides for our teams, local businesses, and subcontractors.”

Midland Station

Works for Morley-Ellenbrook Line begin as Midland Station design released

Works to prepare for the rail corridor in the Tonkin Highway median have begun, while new designs for Midland Station are released.

The current works include the construction of two underpasses with dive structures to enable the line to enter and exit the highway, as well as travel underneath the Reid Highway and Tonkin Highway interchange.

A road and bus bridge will also be built at Broun Avenue, including a bus interchange station, to enable access to the Morley Station.

The Tonkin Gap project is one of a number of major infrastructure projects in Western Australia that have been accelerated to encourage the economy to recovery after the COVID-19 pandemic.

The works follow the signing of the contract for the construction of the Morley-Ellenbrook line.

“We now have workers on the ground starting the vital enabling works for the train to travel down Tonkin Highway to Ellenbrook,” said WA Transport Minister Rita Saffioti.

“These works will create thousands of local jobs and opportunities for local businesses.”

The rail enabling works are expected to be complete in late 2022 and the full Tonkin Gap project in late 2023.

Updated concept designs for Midland Station
Revised concept station designs have been released for the new Midland Station, also part of the WA Metronet program.

The new station will involve decommissioning the existing Midland Station and building a new station closer to commercial and health facilities and better integrated with the surrounding community.

The project also involves the removal of the Helena Street level crossing and a new crossing at Cale Street for more efficient traffic movements.

The alliance contract for the station works is expected to be awarded in mid-2021.

Saffioti said the project would link with the new railcar manufacturing site.

“The new station will also link to Metronet’s Bellevue Depot, making it the first landmark our brand new C-Series trains will pass through on their way to regular service on the network.”

The station will also service the nearby Midland TAFE, where a purpose-built training facility for rail courses was recently finished.

Bullsbrook intermodal terminal takes the next step

The Western Australia state government is taking a market-led proposal for an intermodal terminal at Bullsbrook to the next stage.

The intermodal terminal proposed by Harvis Capital would be built at Bullsbrook, north east of Perth, and could facilitate further development in the outer Perth suburb.

WA Transport Minister Rita Saffioti said the WA government is considering the proposal and the proposal has progressed to stage 2 of the project assessment process. Harvis Capital will now submit a detailed business case for the project.

“An intermodal terminal at Bullsbrook has the potential to boost the efficiency and capacity of the rail freight system, reduce truck movements on metropolitan roads and to increase job creation and economic development in Perth’s north-eastern corridor,” said Saffioti.

“We will continue to work closely with industry to encourage and support more freight on rail, to make our freight supply chains as efficient and cost effective as possible.”

The WA Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage is preparing a district structure plan for Bullsbrook to support the proposed intermodal terminal.

The area is earmarked for further industrial expansion, with an intermodal terminal supporting rail to connect the future businesses with the Fremantle Port and Kwinana Outer Harbour, as well as the northern regions of Western Australia.

The proposed intermodal terminal would be located alongside the narrow-gauge freight rail line passing through Bullsbrook and connecting north to Dongara.

Saffioti said that the intermodal terminal would be a catalyst for moving freight onto rail and ensuring future freight needs produced by the development are handled by rail.

“One of our key election commitments was to move more freight onto rail to help ease road congestion and improve safety,” said Saffioti.